poisonnoak:

bombing:

strwberry97:

bombing:

for someone who’s 70% water you don’t look very refreshing

BURNNNN

water cannot be burned

EVAPORATEEE

(via status-excessu)

17 hours ago
396,315 notes
legendary:

gojira-senpai:

Love that the Kraken is the largest movie monster, not Slattern like everyone says.

Do you know your movie monsters’ sizes?

legendary:

gojira-senpai:

Love that the Kraken is the largest movie monster, not Slattern like everyone says.

Do you know your movie monsters’ sizes?

17 hours ago
1,883 notes
newsweek:

Artificial blood ‘will be manufactured in factories’
Wellcome Trust-funded stem cell research has produced red blood cells fit for transfusion into humans, paving the way for the mass production of blood.
Artificial blood ‘will be manufactured in factories’ - Telegraph

newsweek:

Artificial blood ‘will be manufactured in factories’

Wellcome Trust-funded stem cell research has produced red blood cells fit for transfusion into humans, paving the way for the mass production of blood.

Artificial blood ‘will be manufactured in factories’ - Telegraph

(via science-junkie)

17 hours ago
809 notes
mathhombre:

From Shouldn’t We Teach GEOMETRY?, Branko Grunbaum, The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Sep., 1981), pp. 232-238 
I will read anything by Grunbaum.


Spongebob

mathhombre:

From Shouldn’t We Teach GEOMETRY?, Branko Grunbaum, The Two-Year College Mathematics Journal, Vol. 12, No. 4 (Sep., 1981), pp. 232-238 

I will read anything by Grunbaum.

Spongebob

(via proofmathisbeautiful)

17 hours ago
297 notes

archiemcphee:

Check out that awesome googly-eyed velociraptor! He’s a giant industrial origami project called KitRex and he was created by Lehigh University grad student Lisa Glover.

"KitRex began as a homework assignment where I was asked to research a manufacturing process and demonstrate it in a unique way. I decided to research Industrial Origami, and over the course of 50 hours I designed, cut, and built a wearable 15-ft long velociraptor out of cardboard. I took him to a costume ball, and when I tromped into the room, literally everyone stopped to stare. He was the star of the evening, and everyone wanted one. I knew I had to do something."

Lisa then started (and successfully funded) a KitRex Kickstarter project to help her mass-produce an adorable 3-foot-long KitRex (since most people don’t have the space for a 15-ft paper dino). After months of prototyping and testing with kids between 8 - 12 years old, the final KitRex was born as a bristol board model that’s easily flat-packed and shipped anywhere (But you have to add your own googly eyes). A few lucky Kickstarter contributors were rewarded with giant 15-foot KitRexes of their very own.

Lisa isn’t quite ready to ship the KitRex, but for the time being you can click here to download a free pattern that fits on a standard 8x10 sheet of paper. It’ll be like playing with a dino hatchling.

[via Uproxx and KitRex]

(via kickstarter)

17 hours ago
787 notes

A strong independent dog who don’t need no man

A strong independent dog who don’t need no man

(Source: givemeinternet, via megustamemes)

17 hours ago
173,727 notes

pokemonqrcodes:

Yay for my favorite legendary trio, Suicune, Raikou, and Entei. c:

2 days ago
31 notes
neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Newly discovered neuron type (yellow) helps zebrafish to coordinate its eye and swimming movements. The image shows the blue-stained brain of a fish larva with the suggested position of the eyes. Credit: © Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology/Kubo) 
How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away
Our eyes not only enable us to recognise objects; they also provide us with a continuous stream of information about our own movements. Whether we run, turn around, fall or sit still in a car – the world glides by us and leaves a characteristic motion trace on our retinas. Seemingly without effort, our brain calculates self-motion from this “optic flow”. This way, we can maintain a stable position and a steady gaze during our own movements. Together with biologists from the University of Freiburg, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried near Munich have now discovered an array of new types of neurons, which help the brain of zebrafish to perceive, and compensate for, self-motion.
Read more

It is a zebra fish!

neurosciencestuff:

(Image caption: Newly discovered neuron type (yellow) helps zebrafish to coordinate its eye and swimming movements. The image shows the blue-stained brain of a fish larva with the suggested position of the eyes. Credit: © Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology/Kubo)

How vision makes sure that little fish do not get carried away

Our eyes not only enable us to recognise objects; they also provide us with a continuous stream of information about our own movements. Whether we run, turn around, fall or sit still in a car – the world glides by us and leaves a characteristic motion trace on our retinas. Seemingly without effort, our brain calculates self-motion from this “optic flow”. This way, we can maintain a stable position and a steady gaze during our own movements. Together with biologists from the University of Freiburg, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried near Munich have now discovered an array of new types of neurons, which help the brain of zebrafish to perceive, and compensate for, self-motion.

Read more

It is a zebra fish!

11 hours ago
50 notes

skunkbear:

Close-ups of butterfly wing scales! You should definitely click on these images to get the full detail.

I’ve paired each amazing close-up (by macro photographer Linden Gledhill) with an image of the corresponding butterfly or moth.  The featured lepidoptera* are (in order of appearance):

*Lepidoptera (the scientific order that includes moths and butterflies) means “scaly wing.” The scales get their color not from pigment - but from microscopic structures that manipulate light.

The great science youtube channel “Smarter Every Day” has two videos on this very subject that I highly recommend:

(via science-junkie)

17 hours ago
3,194 notes
theparisreview:

“I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer.”
RIP Gabriel García Márquez

theparisreview:

“I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer.”

RIP Gabriel García Márquez

17 hours ago
1,189 notes
newyorker:

In memory of the Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who died today at 87, a look back at Jon Lee Anderson’s 1999 Profile of the writer: http://nyr.kr/QrWlKv

newyorker:

In memory of the Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who died today at 87, a look back at Jon Lee Anderson’s 1999 Profile of the writer: http://nyr.kr/QrWlKv

(Source: archives.newyorker.com, via emergentfutures)

17 hours ago
1,077 notes

thelittlethingsdownunder:

edsock:

marchingjaybird:

davidmarquez:

Australia’s Stay in School Campaign ain’t fucking around.

THIS IS THE FUNNIEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN I AM ACTUALLY CRYING

i need an hour or two to recover after watching this

I am pissing my fucking pants im sorry goddamn australia

Dear glob that came out of nowhere

(via status-excessu)

17 hours ago
294,825 notes